The End to a Means‏

Audio Documentary

‘And if they reject such an empire, it can be imposed on them by way of arms, and such a war would be just according to the declarations of natural law […] In sum: it is just, convenient, and in conformity with natural law that those honorable, intelligent, virtuous, and human men dominate all those who lack these qualities.’ – Ginés de Sepúlveda

‘The starving fellah, Fanon pointed out, does not have to inquire into the truth. He is, they are, the truth. It is we who institute this ‘Truth’. We must now undo their narratively condemned status’ – Sylvia Wynter

‘I don’t think I ever claimed, or meant to claim, that Afro-pessimism sees blackness as a kind of pathogen. I think I probably do, or at least hope that it is, insofar as I bear the hope that blackness bears or is the potential to end the world.’ – Fred Moten

‘I knew that no matter how far from home I traveled, I would never be able to leave my past behind. I would never be able to imagine being the kind of person who had not been made and marked by slavery. I was black and a history of terror had produced that identity. Terror was “captivity without the possibility of flight,” inescapable violence, precarious life. There was no going back to a time or place before slavery, and going beyond it no doubt would entail nothing less momentous than yet another revolution.’ – Saidiya Hartman

Today Vitamin D is happy to share a recent audio documentary entitled ‘Ending The World’ which was produced to contribute to an exhibition entitled ‘Visions of the Future’ hosted by OOMK (www.oomk.net). Members of the Decoloniality London (DL) network were asked what the titular phrase means to them and how they see it being made manifest. The last three quotations above are in some shape or form responding to Sepúlveda’s historical justification for the earth to be governed by colonial means. Moreover, they are building on the early clarion calls made by Aime Cesaire and Frantz Fanon to move towards a total transformation of the world and so the voices in the recording attempt to speak to this demand while also extending and elevating it to contemporary discourse.

The people heard here will also be organising and facilitating an upcoming study programme on decoloniality which is due to have its launch day on 14 March.  As a part of DL, Vitamin D will be releasing additional information about this project in the near future and will also link to the relevant website as things get finalised.

In the mean time, check out this short piece on what it might mean to take the cry to ‘end the world’ as a serious strategy of liberation from the colonial matrix of power.

Do get in touch if you’d like to register for the launch event.

Frantz Fanon and the Struggle for Decolonial Ideas

Discussion

On today’s episode Vitamin D is glad to welcome Professor Lewis R. Gordon to introduce the life, works and thought of one Frantz Fanon and his immense impact on contemporary discourses of decoloniality and beyond. Lewis has been writing on Fanon, Africana philosophy and black existentialism for over 30 years and has tirelessly engaged in the struggle for decolonial ideas all over the Global South.

In our conversation we delve right into a short biography of Frantz Fanon and his importance for decolonial and humanist thought and praxis whilst Lewis also shares with us prescient critiques of current intellectual and political trends such as Afropessimism and intersectionality as well as the state of decoloniality itself.

Also, please bare with us as we had some technical difficulties in recording this one and we would also like to thank Lewis again for making time for us even though he was under the weather.

 

Books:

Lewis R. Gordon.    Existentia Africana: Understanding Africana Existentialist Thought

                                     Bad Faith and Antiblack Racism

                                   An Introduction to Africana Philosophy

Nelson Maldonado-Torres. Against War: Views from the Underside of Modernity.

Jane Anna Gordon. Creolizing Political Theory: Reading Rousseau through Fanon

Walter Mignolo. The Darker Side of Western Modernity: Global Futures, Decolonial Options.