Frantz Fanon and the Struggle for Decolonial Ideas

Discussion

On today’s episode Vitamin D is glad to welcome Professor Lewis R. Gordon to introduce the life, works and thought of one Frantz Fanon and his immense impact on contemporary discourses of decoloniality and beyond. Lewis has been writing on Fanon, Africana philosophy and black existentialism for over 30 years and has tirelessly engaged in the struggle for decolonial ideas all over the Global South.

In our conversation we delve right into a short biography of Frantz Fanon and his importance for decolonial and humanist thought and praxis whilst Lewis also shares with us prescient critiques of current intellectual and political trends such as Afropessimism and intersectionality as well as the state of decoloniality itself.

Also, please bare with us as we had some technical difficulties in recording this one and we would also like to thank Lewis again for making time for us even though he was under the weather.

 

Books:

Lewis R. Gordon.    Existentia Africana: Understanding Africana Existentialist Thought

                                     Bad Faith and Antiblack Racism

                                   An Introduction to Africana Philosophy

Nelson Maldonado-Torres. Against War: Views from the Underside of Modernity.

Jane Anna Gordon. Creolizing Political Theory: Reading Rousseau through Fanon

Walter Mignolo. The Darker Side of Western Modernity: Global Futures, Decolonial Options.

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Feminism and Colonial Difference

Discussion

Today we have academic researcher Sara Salem who is based at the Institute of Social Studies in the Netherlands and Fatuma Khaireh who is a member of the OOMK collective In London. We chat about the histories of feminist movements, gender as a Eurocentric (mis)conception and the limits of intersectionality. Thanks to Sara for making time for us during her short stay in town and Fatuma for making it such a lively discussion!

 

Books mentioned in podcast:

T.Denean Sharpley-Whiting. Frantz Fanon: Conflicts and Feminisms

Denise Ferreira da Silva. Toward a Global Idea of Race

Saidiya Hartman. Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery and Self-Making in Nineteenth Century America; Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route.

Hortense Spillers. Black, White and in Color.

Chandra Talpade Mohanty. Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses.

Abdelmalek Sayad: The Suffering of the Immigrant.

The Many Legacies of Stuart Hall: A chat with cultural historian Dr. Daniel McNeil

Discussion

stuart hall homepage

 

This impromptu chat was recorded on the day after Stuart Hall’s passing on Tuesday the 11th of February amidst a flurry of obituaries on the influential and much celebrated postcolonial scholar, media theorist and public intellectual. Daniel and I had planned to catch up on things over the previous weekend and so when the sad news reached us on the Monday of the 10th we were still working through the loss and what Hall had meant in our respective lives; Daniel as a Black British cultural historian who excelled as an academic in the wake of the period marked by Hall’s contributions to the western academic landscape, not least of which was the short-lived Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies at Birmingham University directed by Hall from 1968 to1979 serving as an important intellectual guidepost; and I, as a refugee several times removed from any notion of a ‘home’ and for whom the terms transnationalism, diaspora, routes and roots have exceeded their significance as merely descriptive terms of the fugee experience and taken on existential qualities.

So this largely unstructured chat on the many legacies of Hall follows as a meditation on how his words have enabled us as individuals to broaden our ethical and political thinking in a rapidly changing world. I for one have profited immensely from his theoretical interventions to help me make sense of such loaded terms as ‘globalism’, or ‘globalisation’, or the ‘global local’, not to mention his acute critique of the neoliberal logic that would come to inform mainstream politics of the last four decades. Having been introduced to his work under Daniel’s tutelage in his Media and Cultural Studies lectures when he was based at the Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation in the University of Hull this chat will also roughly cover some of Hall’s intellectual contributions with regards to media’s role in society, anti-racist rhetoric, and the institutionalisation of cultural studies, a subject of study he helped inaugurate in the 19060s.

Race and the Colonial Matrix of Power

Discussion
 
 
 
On this episode Vitamin D sat down with ethnic studies scholar and well-traveled speaker on decolonial thought from the Americas, Ramon Grosfoguel. Ramon is associate professor of ethnic studies and Chicano studies at University of California, Berkeley and has traveled extensively to speak and participate in various workshops across the globe. Vitamin D first met Ramon at a couple of his visits to the IHRC (Islamic Human Rights Commission) in London where he delivered lectures on the genealogy of the colonial underside of European modernity. We were lucky enough to catch up with him online as he graciously spent over an hour with us recording this podcast from home and went over the notion of the colonial matrix of power in much more depth. In this discussion Ramon unpacks its history(ies), its relationship to European modernity and other forms of liberation theories, the significance of race as its major organizing principle and much more.

Communicating Liberation: A Talk with I Mix What I like’s Jared A. Ball

Discussion

In this first dose recorded earlier in the year, Vitamin D sat down with Media and Communication theorist, political activist and radio DJ Dr. Jared A. Ball from the I Mix What I Like  podcast. Dr. Ball was gracious enough to tell us about his personal journey of politicization, his subsequent projects attempting to apply his knowledge and expertise within media to anti-colonial and freedom movements in the United States, and the nature and severity of the obstacles he has faced, and still is facing, within the established media power structure. Along the way we touched on the political and pedagogical legacies of the recently deceased Amiri Baraka and Stuart Hall, the concept of emancipatory journalism, and pondered whether ‘Media’ in general can be decolonized in 2014.