Fade to Black (Final Vitamin D Episode)

Audio Documentary, Discussion

”Allow grief to take you into a political terrain that no one can satisfy”

Joy James

 

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Today’s episode will speak to Dr. Selamawit Terrefe and Dr. Frank Wilderson III focusing on the political discourse and theoretical project of Afropessimism. This conversation was recorded a day after the guests conducted a workshop introducing the key elements of the theory’s formulation as well as its implication for black-led movement organisations, and took on questions and comments from the black participants present on the day. Following from that, the position of blackness within the symbolic order, and in turn, the differently gendered positions within the intramural, constituted some of the most stressed talking points as were Afropessimism’s implications and relevance for black people across the globe, particularly those whose liberation discourse is tied to the claim to land.

Even as this podcast’s emphasis has been on the decolonial theorization of the coloniality of power, its ontological as well as epistemological predominance through and via the prime organizing principle of “race” on subjects not racialized as white throughout modernity, the last three episodes of Vitamin D have signalled a sharp turn towards blackness as a singular position in the modern world. This is not to say that blackness has no relationship to the “colonial matrix” but that it sits rather uneasily within its “version of events” and its rendering of global structure(s) of power. Colonial power is diffused globally in such a way, we are told, that the slave, the native and the worker share a common space-time and its assumed that the slave has access to a classed, gendered and sexed integrity all the while blackness as a limit case, the sine qua non inhabitant of the zone of non-being and social death, is harnessed to stand in as the showpiece recipient of coloniality’s most egregious violence.

The producers of this podcast will endevour to explore the singularity of global antiblackness and the resistance to it by black people across the world from this point forward. As black people resist in various ways, we will insist that the acme of such resistance is Afropessimism. Alluding to a popular Fanonian theme of asphyxiation and freedom, decolonial scholars tell us that ”coloniality is the very air we breathe”. To which we respond: ”decoloniality inhales the slave to lend itself a radical posture as slavery is what has had all of humanity on life support.” Its buoyancy as a radical theory depends on the slave’s exsanguination. Breathe in, bleed out.

 

Please go to https://thedummymen.tumblr.com/ for future podcasts, discussions and more.

 

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Wishing Against Hope: The Radical Prospects of Afro-pessimism

Discussion

Wishing Against Hope

The Radical Prospects of Afro-pessimism

‘’I am the wish in the wishbone
that white people break for good luck’’

The Last Poets – Black Wish

‘’Give a dog a bone, leave a dog alone
let a dog roam and he’ll find his way home
Home of the brave, my home is a cage
and yo I’ma slave til’ my home is a grave’’

DMX – Ruff Ryders’ Anthem

In a recent elucidation of the conceptual project of Afro-pessimism, scholar Jared Sexton referred to a pressingly apt metaphor that hinted at the restrictions that are inevitably placed on the thought and affect of black social life whenever it attempts to articulate its grievances within the congregation of the multitude. Sexton, pace Cedric Kyles, juxtaposes the black ‘’wish factor’’ against the white ‘’hope creed’’ whereby the latter’s hopes of overcoming a conflict sutures a gap in the white/non-white divide that renders the former’s calls for confronting an antagonism without an auditor. In its stead it is reacquainted with an age-old watchdog unleashed to roam and police. However, at an altogether different fissure, namely the breaking point at which the forked bone is made to split by the push and pull of the nonblack adversaries (say the conflict of Thanksgiving or the articulation of orientalism and war), resides the ‘’pained body’’ of the black. The black of slavery and slaveness. In this space, otherwise known as ‘’the hold of the ship’’, helping us to elaborate on this black wish against an antiblack hope (and in giving the dog a bone to choke on!) on the pod today are Patrice Douglass, Nicholas Brady, Kevin Cobham and Omar Ricks.

 

Check out Nicholas Brady’s work at https://outofnowhereblog.wordpress.com/ and the Baltimore grassroots organization he is affiliated with at http://lbsbaltimore.com/

Check out Omar Ricks at http://cosmichoboes.blogspot.co.uk/ and https://berkeley.academia.edu/OmarRicks

Check out Patrice Douglass at https://uci.academia.edu/PatriceDiannaDouglass

Kevin Cobham can be reached on facebook under Kevin Bismark Cobham